Teacher fellows

Miriam Tomusk

I joined Parallel Histories because I was drawn to the way in which parallel narratives provide an accessible way of navigating the study of difficult and controversial history. I believe that the way we teach and understand History is of paramount importance because our understanding of the past fundamentally shapes our understanding of the world we live in, whether we realise it or not. Coming from an international background, I am especially drawn to way in which different understandings of history help shape the cultural and political identities of different groups of people; history is undoubtedly something that is both deeply personal and deeply political, and it is important that we are able to effectively study the intersection between these different facets of the subject. Studying History at undergrad, I became particularly interested in Early Modern History and the ways in which cultural and political developments in this period continue to impact the world today. Here’s a link to an article I wrote about Mary I and Elizabeth I which explores how a parallel narratives approach to studying the history of Mary I and Elizabeth I can help challenge preconceptions about Tudor history.

I am excited to be working at Parallel Histories and I enjoy making programmes which highlight for students how different historical narratives are constructed. I’m also enjoying the challenge of putting more and more reliance on primary sources to do the job of telling the historical story – it’s something that’s routine at university but less so at secondary schools.

I’m a native Estonian speaker with fluent English and moderate French.

Miriam Tomusk

I joined Parallel Histories because I was drawn to the way in which parallel narratives provide an accessible way of navigating the study of difficult and controversial history. I believe that the way we teach and understand History is of paramount importance because our understanding of the past fundamentally shapes our understanding of the world we live in, whether we realise it or not. Coming from an international background, I am especially drawn to way in which different understandings of history help shape the cultural and political identities of different groups of people; history is undoubtedly something that is both deeply personal and deeply political, and it is important that we are able to effectively study the intersection between these different facets of the subject. Studying History at undergrad, I became particularly interested in Early Modern History and the ways in which cultural and political developments in this period continue to impact the world today. Here’s a link to an article I wrote about Mary I and Elizabeth I which explores how a parallel narratives approach to studying the history of Mary I and Elizabeth I can help challenge preconceptions about Tudor history.

I am excited to be working at Parallel Histories and I enjoy making programmes which highlight for students how different historical narratives are constructed. I’m also enjoying the challenge of putting more and more reliance on primary sources to do the job of telling the historical story – it’s something that’s routine at university but less so at secondary schools.

I’m a native Estonian speaker with fluent English and moderate French.